Gift of Crisis

The tumult of a faith deconstruction, especially in the Mormon faith, has been termed as a crisis, it’s often referred to as a faith crisis. There are podcasts focused on this, even books written about it. BYU did a study on the social media impact on a faith crisis which defines how the church views …

President Oaks Fibbing For The Lord Again – Prompt and Public Disavowal of Racism?

The church celebrates its own decision to stop the racially discriminatory practice of banning the priesthood from anyone of African descent in 1978. To show that they are not racist, they wanted to point out that it has now been 40 years since they stopped being racist. There was a big self-congratulatory spectacle planned for …

I Know The Church Is True

Nearly every speaker in a testimony meeting says “I know the church is true.” This is a nonsensical statement, but considering the Illusory Truth Effect we can see what the church may be after. We know that repetitions don’t make statements any more true, but psychologically we do tend to believe things we’ve heard repeatedly. …

Bamboozled Long Enough, We Tend to Reject Any Evidence of The Bamboozle

Carl Sagan, an astrophysicist, cosmologist, author, and science communicator, captivated the world with his unparalleled ability to convey the wonders of the cosmos. Renowned for his role in popularizing science, Sagan’s legacy extends beyond academia, leaving an indelible mark on the public’s understanding of the universe. Carl Sagan’s well-known quote about being bamboozled exactly recounts …

Church Against Bucket Lists, Traveling and Following Dreams

As we embark on the New Year with resolutions and travel aspirations, consider Elder Rasband’s counsel, which dissuades members from pursuing personal dreams and travel experiences. Discouraging the pursuit of individual “bucket lists,” he advocates prioritizing the church over personal needs, asserting that such pursuits will not bring fulfillment to one’s soul. This raises questions …

Men Of Their Times

Church leaders assert that they directly follow God’s guidance, exempting themselves from apologies and social pressure, like for example addressing racism within church doctrine and culture. Apologists claim that church leaders are merely “men of their times” and can’t be judged by today’s standards. These two ideas don’t work together. Either the leaders are led …