I Know The Church Is True

Nearly every speaker in a testimony meeting says “I know the church is true.” This is a nonsensical statement, but considering the Illusory Truth Effect we can see what the church may be after. We know that repetitions don’t make statements any more true, but psychologically we do tend to believe things we’ve heard repeatedly. …

Illusory Truth Effect

What is the Illusory Truth Effect? Imagine your brain is like a sponge that soaks up information. When you hear something many times, even if it’s not true, your brain starts to believe it. This is called the Illusory Truth Effect. We tend to believe something is true, just because we’ve heard it over and …

Cherish Your Doubts

This reading for worship, from the Unitarian Universalize Association, emphasizes the value of doubt as an essential and positive element in the pursuit of truth and knowledge. It contrasts doubt with unquestioning belief, arguing that beliefs immune to questioning can lead to error and incompleteness. Doubt, in this context, is portrayed as the key to …

BYU Counsels Divorcees to “Fill the holes that were once filled by sex”

The Covenant Intimacy Conversations discuss the challenging transition individuals may face when moving from a state of being sexually active to sexually inactive due to divorce or the death of a spouse. It states that while it may not be possible to fully replace the aspect of sexual intimacy lost through such life changes, individuals …

Would There Be Fewer Mistakes if God Restored His Church Through You?

Elder Kyle McKay, the Executive Director of the Church History Department asks a rhetorical question. He asks during a devotional address (A Sure and Certain Foundation) in which he attempts to bolster testimonies by teaching how to believe. He absolves church leaders of mistakes by basically countering that “you couldn’t do any better.” He suggests …

Deseret News in 2015 claims the term Mormon can only refer to the largest LDS church, and that Mormons have a problem controlling the public's opinion of them due to bad actors like Warren Jeffs. By 2018, new church president Russell M. Nelson said "If we allow nicknames to be used or adopt or even sponsor those nicknames ourselves, He is offended... To remove the Lord’s name from the Lord’s Church is a major victory for Satan." | wasmormon.org
Deseret News in 2015 claims the term Mormon can only refer to the largest LDS church, and that Mormons have a problem controlling the public's opinion of them due to bad actors like Warren Jeffs. By 2018, new church president Russell M. Nelson said "If we allow nicknames to be used or adopt or even sponsor those nicknames ourselves, He is offended... To remove the Lord’s name from the Lord’s Church is a major victory for Satan."
“Meet the Mormons” is a feature-length documentary film produced by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints that will be released in select theaters on 10 October 2014. Four years later, in October 2018, new church president Russell M. Nelson said "If we allow nicknames to be used or adopt or even sponsor those nicknames ourselves, He is offended... To remove the Lord’s name from the Lord’s Church is a major victory for Satan." This documentary was a major victory for Satan, not only sponsored by but also produced by the church, which generated proceeds donated to the American Red Cross. Living prophet insists that God was offended. | wasmormon.org
“Meet the Mormons” is a feature-length documentary film produced by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints that will be released in select theaters on 10 October 2014. Four years later, in October 2018, new church president Russell M. Nelson said "If we allow nicknames to be used or adopt or even sponsor those nicknames ourselves, He is offended... To remove the Lord’s name from the Lord’s Church is a major victory for Satan." This documentary was a major victory for Satan, not only sponsored by but also produced by the church, which generated proceeds donated to the American Red Cross. Living prophet insists that God was offended.
After The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints launched its “I’m a Mormon” media campaign in Great Britain in 2013, LDS officials say they are seeing significant increases in British interest in the church. These campaigns ended abruptly in 2018 when new church president Russell M. Nelson said "If we allow nicknames to be used or adopt or even sponsor those nicknames ourselves, He is offended... To remove the Lord’s name from the Lord’s Church is a major victory for Satan." | wasmormon.org
After the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints launched its “I’m a Mormon” media campaign in Great Britain in 2013, LDS officials say they are seeing significant increases in British interest in the church. These campaigns ended abruptly in 2018 when new church president Russell M. Nelson said "If we allow nicknames to be used or adopt or even sponsor those nicknames ourselves, He is offended... To remove the Lord’s name from the Lord’s Church is a major victory for Satan."
In New York City, the Church launched the “I’m a Mormon” campaign in 2011. The campaign ended abruptly in 2018 when new church president Russell M. Nelson said "If we allow nicknames to be used or adopt or even sponsor those nicknames ourselves, He is offended... To remove the Lord’s name from the Lord’s Church is a major victory for Satan." 
In New York City, the Church launched the “I’m a Mormon” campaign in 2010. The campaign ended abruptly in 2018 when new church president Russell M. Nelson said "If we allow nicknames to be used or adopt or even sponsor those nicknames ourselves, He is offended... To remove the Lord’s name from the Lord’s Church is a major victory for Satan." 
I'm a Mormon was an advertising and outreach campaign by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 2010 to 2018 that aimed to combat stereotypes and misconceptions about the church by featuring short profiles from church members (also known as Mormons) on the mormon.org website. In October 2018, the church president Russell M. Nelson said that the use of nicknames such as Mormon was "a major victory for Satan." The outreach campaign thus ended. | wasmormon.org
I'm a Mormon was an advertising and outreach campaign by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 2010 to 2018 that aimed to combat stereotypes and misconceptions about the church by featuring short profiles from church members (also known as Mormons) on the mormon.org website. In October 2018, the church president Russell M. Nelson said that the use of nicknames such as Mormon was "a major victory for Satan." The outreach campaign thus ended.

Major Victories for Satan

LDS Church leader, Russell Nelson, has for decades wanted to do away with the nickname of the church. It seems to have been a pet peeve of his, and he single-handedly announced a plea to use the full name of the church in 1990 when he was a junior apostle. The next conference, however, President …

Don’t Say Mormon

Marc Oslund and John Dehlin discussed Russell M. Nelson’s “Victory for Satan” talk on Mormon Stories Episode #1424. They discuss that the blind belief in only the living prophet’s words is unsustainable and Nelson’s war on ‘Mormon‘ has been his own personal pet peeve from the beginning. The message from President Nelson that using the …

Can Mormons Drink Caffeine?

Mormons and those interested in joining the church are instructed that members of God’s church don’t drink coffee or tea. It comes from the Word of Wisdom and has been interpreted differently over the years, but it has always included “hot drinks”. The Word of Wisdom states that hot drinks are not for the belly. …

Explore the Origin Story of wasmormon.org – A Mormon Book Reviews Podcast Episode

A recent episode of the Mormon Book Reviews podcast features an interview with Evan, the creator of wasmormon.org, and his brother Garrett. Evan shares the story of how he came to create the website and why he chose to share his experience of leaving the Mormon church. The interview includes the personal stories of faith …

Mormon Authorities Threaten Doubters With “Don’t You Dare Bail” Messages

There are myriad warnings against dissension and apostasy by church leaders. Church leaders are afraid of those who leave the church behind. Those who leave have the gumption and the gall to stand up for what they believe in, rather than believing what they are told to believe. Those who leave have the courage to …